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Week of 4/17/2017

Week of 4/17/2017

For a lot of equine enthusiasts, this one’s pretty unpleasant. A miniature horse is now recovering after she was discovered in what Mississippi Animal Rescue League officials deem one of the worst cases of animal abuse they’ve seen.

It appears that the owner had surgically removed her tail at the base of her spine and was sexually abusing her prior to his death. When the deceased’s family members arrived to close up the house, they found the underweight and mutilated horse in a room with a concrete floor and a bucket for water.

While Mississippi law does not condone bestiality, Kentucky law has no statute prohibiting sex with animals. I’ve been told that’s because the kind of thing reported in the above article doesn’t happen, so we don’t need a law against it.

Meanwhile in Carson City, a bill that would outlaw bestiality in Nevada passed out of Assembly Committee. Thanks in part to input from the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), Assembly bill 391 is moving closer to becoming law. If Texas and Nevada make bestiality illegal (as it appears they will), Kentucky will be one of only six states where sexual predators can still rape animals with impunity.

Ryan Danyl McDonald at sentencing

AR man sentenced for raping dogs, horses

Also, an Arkansas man was just sentenced for 27 counts of bestiality after police searched his phone and discovered videos of him raping dogs and horses. Ryan Danyl McDonald will serve six years of a split 12-year sentence for violating Arkansas’ law prohibiting bestiality.

When released, will McDonald relocate to the Bluegrass State? By 2023, Kentucky could be the only state in the US where animal rape is still legal. If that seems preposterous, just ask the hunting and big-agriculture lobbies now controlling the General Assembly whether any legislation backed by HSUS could advance in Frankfort.

And this from Vermont, where animal laws don’t usually bear such a close resemblance to those of Kentucky. VT Rep. Curt McCormack has introduced a bill that would let Vermont prosecutors charge people who sexually exploit animals. Currently, an offender cannot be convicted unless the prosecutor proves the animal was physically injured by the defendant during the rape. Sound familiar? Yes, we’ll be tracking the progress of H.325 during the few weeks that remain in the 2017 Vermont legislative session.