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Week of 6/12/2017

Week of 6/12/2017

Alabama couple charged with bestiality, child porn and child rape

Being a police officer doesn’t necessarily make someone more honest or trustworthy than anyone else. But while you & I may choose to read about this stuff in the news, cops are working these criminal cases day and night. Whether they want to or not. So when they say (as they have for years) that people who abuse animals sexually and otherwise are likely to abuse humans too, I believe them.

But you don’t have to take their word for it. If you have a strong enough stomach, just search the news feeds. That’s what I’ve been doing these past few months. And I’ve noticed in several otherwise unrelated cases that animal rapists are often directly involved in the sexual exploitation of children. That’s a polite way of saying they produce or trade photos or videos of human children getting raped.

Yet one more recent example: Daniel Ray Dunn and Kelsey Culp of Shelby County Alabama. The couple was recently charged with raping a 12-year-old girl, making child porn, and sexually assaulting a female dog.

Unlike Kentucky, Alabama has a law against bestiality. It’s just a toothless misdemeanor law with a maximum sentence of one year in prison. But because animal rape is illegal in the Heart of Dixie, prosecutors can do more with this case than they could here in the Bluegrass State.

Here’s another one from this week. The third conviction for raping a young girl earned Minnesotan John William Magney a life sentence. What’s this have to do with animal rape? Read the article carefully. Right there in the seventh paragraph (do I sound like a conspiracy theorist yet?) — Magney pled guilty to a bestiality charge in 2008.

Minnesota’s bestiality law is about as weak as Alabama’s. One year maximum and a $3,000 fine. If MN had a felony bestiality law, maybe Magney wouldn’t have had the opportunity to rape his most recent victim(s).

Meanwhile, Vermont Governor Phil Scott just signed a new law outlawing bestiality in the Green Mountain State. Vermont, Nevada and Texas now join 41 other states where animal rape is no longer legal. So yes, it can be done. Constituents can talk to legislators, and special interests’ stranglehold on power at the state level can be broken. By our action or inaction, we Kentuckians will decide whether the General Assembly fixes this egregious omission, or allows Kentucky to become the relocation destination for displaced animal rapists.